Why Some Chronic and Intractable Pain Patients Are Against Those With Addiction

When a pain patient sees a pain management physician, the majority of patients are required to sign a “Pain Contract” in order to be seen and have ongoing treatment by the pain physician. There are many rules a patient has to abide by in these pain contracts.

Some of these rules include:

 

*Agreeing to random urine drug tests

(If a patient has any illegal substances, other prescription pain medication not prescribed by the pain physician, or even medical marijuana show up in their urine, they will be terminated from the pain physicians office and care. This is done to make sure the patient is following their pain physicians orders, not obtaining medications from another physician, or using illegal substances).

 

*Agreeing to random pill counts

 (Patients can be called at any time and expected to come into the pain physicians office, in person, with their medication, in the original containers to have it counted. This is to make sure the patient is taking the pain medication as prescribed and not misusing the it).

 

*Filling prescriptions at one pharmacy only

(Most pain physicians require that the patient tell them ahead of time what pharmacy they plan to get their prescriptions filled at before any prescriptions are given to the patient or sent to the pharmacy. This is done to make it easier for the pain physician to find out what prescriptions were filled and when they were filled).

 

*No use of medical marijuana, recreational marijuana, or any other drug whether prescribed or not

(The pain physician will make sure the patient is not taking any other substances or medications not prescribed by them by doing random urine drug tests. Patients risk being terminated from their pain physicians office and care if something not prescribed by them or something illegal shows up in the patient’s urine drug test).

 

*No other physician can prescribe pain medication except current pain physician

(The pain physician will check the online State Prescription Monitoring Service to make sure a patient has not been prescribed or has filled a prescription for pain medication from another physician. This service also lets the pain physician know that the patient is using only one pharmacy to fill their pain medications).

***With this service, any physician, as well as law enforcement, can look up a patient’s name and see what medications were filled, where they were filled, the amount of each medication filled, what physician prescribed the medication, and the date in which the medication was filled.

And-

(If a patient needs surgery or dental procedure that require pain medication, this has to be set up in advance. The physician or dentist doing the procedure has to notify the pain management physician about the procedure and what medications are going to be used).

 

*Mandatory follow-ups with the pain physician every 1-3 months for re-evaluation and new written prescriptions

(A pain physician requires the patient to follow up every 1-3 months to be re-evaluated and to get new pain prescriptions written. A patient cannot call their office requesting a refill on their pain medication. The patient has to be seen in person to get written prescription refills on their pain medication. If a patient misses their appointment, or does not call to cancel and reschedule their appointment, they may be terminated from their pain physicians office and care. This is done to make sure the patient is following their pain physicians orders and in order to continue the patients ongoing treatment).

These are only a few of the rules in a Pain Contract. Most pain contracts have additional rules, but these are the most popular, so to speak. Most pain patients who see pain a management physician, are heavily monitored and have to abide by the rules in the pain contract in order to receive and continue pain treatment.

 

In March, 2016, the CDC made their Opioid Prescribing Guidelines public. These guidelines were written by the CDC and those in the addiction recovery community because of the increasing number of people overdosing and dying from opioid abuse and misuse, aka, the “Opioid Epidemic”. The guidelines were written to be “Voluntary” for primary care physicians, but many physicians, including pain physicians, have adopted these guidelines as “Law” in their practice. Many pain physicians have done this because of the increased presence and the harassment of the DEA. Many physicians have been threatened by government officials if they don’t abide by the CDC guidelines and reduce the amount of prescriptions they write and the amount of medication their patients are on.

Many things have rapidly gone downhill for pain patients since the CDC guidelines were made public. Pain patients have lost their physicians, been totally cut off their medication or have been made to drastically decrease their medication to a dosage that no longer manages their chronic or intractable pain. Many pain patients can no longer hold down a job, take care of their family or even take care of themselves because they no longer get their medications or have been made to decrease their medication.

 

Then… pain patients were made to hear, by the media, through articles and videos, that those with addiction problems should be treated with opioid medication for their opioid addiction.

 

Those in the addiction recovery community want to treat the pain and agony of withdrawal with an opioid medication. What about the pain and agony that pain patients have to deal with on a daily basis?
The pain and agony of withdrawal goes away in a few weeks, a chronic or intractable pain patients “pain and agony never goes away…  It can last a lifetime.

 

With the current so called “Opioid Epidemic”, and pain patients being blamed for this epidemic, many pain patients are asking themselves;
“What more do I have to do and how many more hoops do I have to jump through in order to get adequate pain treatment and the medications I need”?

 

 

Here is some brief information on the opioid medications that the addiction recovery community wants to treat opioid addiction with.

 

 

Methadone

Methadone is an opioid medication. An opioid is sometimes called a narcotic.

Methadone reduces withdrawal symptoms in people addicted to heroin or other narcotic drugs without causing the “high” associated with the drug addiction.

Methadone is used as a pain reliever and as part of drug addiction detoxification and maintenance programs. It is available only from a certified pharmacy.

Important information-

Methadone can slow or stop your breathing, and may be habit-forming even at regular doses . MISUSE OF THIS MEDICINE CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH, especially in a child or other person using the medicine without a prescription.

Taking this medicine during pregnancy may cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the newborn.

Fatal side effects can occur if you use this medicine with alcohol, or with other drugs that cause drowsiness or slow your breathing.

 

 

Buprenorphine

Buprenorphine is an opioid medication. An opioid is sometimes called a narcotic.

Buprenorphine is used to treat narcotic addiction. Buprenorphine is not for use as a pain medication.

Buprenorphine may also be used for purposes not listed in this medication guide.

Important information-

Buprenorphine can slow or stop your breathing. Never use this medicine in larger amounts, or for longer than prescribed. Buprenorphine may be habit-forming, even at regular doses. Never share this medicine with another person, especially someone with a history of drug abuse or addiction. Keep the medication in a place where others cannot get to it.

MISUSE OF NARCOTIC MEDICINE CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH, especially in a child or other person using the medicine without a prescription.

Tell your doctor if you are pregnant. Buprenorphine may cause life-threatening addiction and withdrawal symptoms in a newborn.

(This medication is used in combination with Naloxone which is called Suboxone)

 

 

Suboxone

Suboxone contains a combination of buprenorphine and naloxone. Buprenorphine is an opioid medication, sometimes called a narcotic. Naloxone blocks the effects of opioid medication, including pain relief or feelings of well-being that can lead to opioid abuse.

Suboxone is used to treat narcotic (opiate) addiction.

Suboxone is not for use as a pain medication.

Important Information-

Suboxone can slow or stop your breathing, and may be habit-forming even at regular doses. MISUSE OF THIS MEDICINE CAN CAUSE ADDICTION, OVERDOSE, OR DEATH, especially in a child or other person using the medicine without a prescription.

Taking Suboxone during pregnancy may cause life-threatening withdrawal symptoms in the newborn.

Fatal side effects can occur if you use Suboxone with alcohol, or with other drugs that cause drowsiness or slow your breathing.

 

Those with chronic or intractable pain did not ask to live the way they do. They live in constant unrelenting daily pain that is unimaginable to those who do not have pain on a daily basis. They were dealt very negative cards in their life. Some are the victims of accidents, whether a car accident, work accident, or something else, and others have diseases they surely didn’t ask for. Many of those who suffer with this type of pain use some sort of opioid medication to manage their pain issues. With their medication being taken away by the US government, it is frustrating for them and their families. It’s hard for them to understand why they can’t have opioid medication for their pain and those with opioid addiction can have opioid medication. They often ask themselves or others;

“Why is our medication being taken away from us and given to addicts?”

I don’t have the answer to something I don’t understand myself.

And…

This is Why Some Chronic and Intractable Pain Patients Are Against Those With Addiction!!!

Torture American Style ? — PHARMACIST STEVE

https://www.facebook.com/plugins/video.php?href=https%3A%2F%2Fwww.facebook.com%2Famy.witonsky%2Fvideos%2F10214650762171836%2F&show_text=0&width=267

If this had been a video of one of the terrorist in GITMO – who has tried to kill us… this would be all over the national news… but… since it is being done “quietly” in a hospital… normally few would be aware of it… Is AMY a “prisoner” of the war on drugs ?…

via Torture American Style ? — PHARMACIST STEVE

Pandemic of Denial ~ Video Teaser/ 2016

Watch “Epidural Steroid Injections & Arachnoiditis – HD” on YouTube

CDC Guidelines Refuted with Scientific Evidence

CDC Guidelines Refuted

EDS and Chronic Pain News & Info

Neat, Plausible, and Generally Wrong: A Response to the CDC Recommendations for Chronic Opioid Use – Medium
Stephen A. Martin, MD, EdM; Ruth A. Potee, MD, DABAM ; and Andrew Lazris, MD

Finally, someone is standing up for the truth about opioids and pain patients. These three courageous M.D.s expose the CDC guidelines for the fraud they are.

They’ve written a well-researched paper that refutes the basis of these unscientific and biased guidelines piece by piece with real evidence from scientific studies to back their claims.  

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CDC Guidelines Refuted with Scientific Evidence

Neat, Plausible, and Generally Wrong: A Response to the CDC Recommendations for Chronic Opioid Use – Medium Stephen A. Martin, MD, EdM; Ruth A. Potee, MD, DABAM ; and Andrew Lazris, MD Finally, som…

Source: CDC Guidelines Refuted with Scientific Evidence

Rally in DC – Note New Location – The Ellipse – 10/22/16 @ 10 am-5 pm – Just across from the White House

RALLY AGAINST PAIN

PLEASE NOTE OUR NEW VENUE – The Oval Alter: President’s Park South (commonly called the Ellipse) is a 52-acre park located just south of the White House fence. Properly, the Ellipse is the na…

Source: Rally in DC – Note New Location – The Ellipse – 10/22/16 @ 10 am-5 pm – Just across from the White House

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Rally Against Pain & For Your Constitutional Rights – Let’s Unite & Let the Policymakers Know We WILL be Heard!!! 10/22/16 @ The Ellipse (NEW VENUE) – 10 am – 5 pm

Bring lawn chairs & get to know fellow chronic pain patients from across the Nation.  Don’t Miss It!     We will have doctors speaking, along with patient advocates, caregivers, patients,…

Source: Rally Against Pain & For Your Constitutional Rights – Let’s Unite & Let the Policymakers Know We WILL be Heard!!! 10/22/16 @ The Ellipse (NEW VENUE) – 10 am – 5 pm

The CDC, DEA and Physicians: My Thoughts and Opinions

Heroin and Pills Framed

For the past year, when I’ve gone to see my Pain Management Physician, I’ve been told at each visit that my medication has to be decreased. I didn’t say too much the first time they did this, but I did speak up on my recent visits. The response I got from the M.D. and the N.P. was the same. They both said, “Due to the CDC Guidelines, we have to start cutting all patients back on their medication.” I asked them why they were following guidelines that were written for Primary Care Physicians and are voluntary? He then explained to my husband and I that they were afraid of losing their license, home, employment, income, and that they could face jail time up to a life sentence if anything went wrong with one of their patients. He continued by saying, the DEA is “Watching them”, and they could get into a lot of trouble if one of their patients misused or abused their medication, then overdosed and died. He also told us the CDC guidelines were addressing the “Opioid Epidemic,” and it was recommended that doctors reduce the amount of medication their patients are taking. Apparently, since the guidelines were made public, the DEA has been watching doctors like a hawk to make sure they follow the guidelines and will find anything they can to get a doctor in trouble. This means anywhere from checking the amount of prescriptions and the number of pills in each prescription they write, to their documentation on a patients chart.

I understand that we have a problem with addiction, drug use, abuse, misuse, overdose, and death from overdose in the US, but I think most of this comes from the vast availability of illegal drugs in our country. What I mean by illegal drugs is, anything which is not prescribed by a doctor. It is fairly easy to get anything you want on the streets in our country, and this is because the DEA and our government has failed at keeping them off the streets. The “War On Drugs.” has failed miserably when it comes to illegal drugs. An example of this is the illegal Opioid Fentanyl, that was introduced to the streets not long ago. This illegal drug has been mixed with other drugs and made into a pill form as well as being put into the heroin supplies on the street. This is a very potent, powerful drug that has killed a lot of people recently because they are unaware of it being in their “supply” that they buy on the street or from their dealer. There is no reason to have a drug like this or any kind of drug being bought or sold on our streets. Apparently the DEA cannot control situations like this so they go after doctors because it is an easier target for them.

Since many Chronic Pain Patients continue to have their medications reduced and/or taken away completely, this  “Opioid Epidemic” as it is called, will continue to get worse. I fear that many patients with chronic pain will resort to the streets to find pain relief and will overdose and die, or they will commit suicide to relieve their pain and daily suffering. Those who make the decision to take their life, depending upon the method they use, could be counted as one of the CDC’s statistics. Speaking of statistics, there are rumors going around on social media saying the way the CDC did their investigation was bogus. Apparently they counted the death of a person from overdose twice if they had any prescription pain medication, as well as illegal drugs in their system. There are also deaths from heroin that were counted as opioid medication deaths because the body quickly metabolizes heroin into morphine. So I guess the question on the minds of so many people, especially those who suffer with chronic pain, is how do they know if it was actually a legitimate “Opioid Medication Overdose”, or was it really an illegal substance that metabolized into an opioid? Somehow I find these rumors to be legitimate, and wonder how many deaths were counted wrong just to make the CDC’s recommendations valid. Nevertheless, I do understand that there is a problem going on, but I think the CDC blew this all out of proportion. I think the first thing they should have addressed was the addiction to illegal drugs. This by far is more pronounced than the addiction to opioid medications. There have been various studies done stating that less than 1-3%, (depending upon the study), of people treated with opioid medications become addicted to them. And most of these opioid medication addictions were due to the person misusing or abusing their medication. 

Before I close my ranting thoughts, I have included a letter that is going around the internet. A Registered Pharmacist wrote a letter to the CDC in reference to his Chronic Pain Conditions. The letter attached below is from Dr. Houry M.D. an ER doctor that works for the CDC at the National Center for Injury Prevention and Control. If you have read my ranting thoughts, please go one step further and read the letter from her. This patient highlighted areas in the letter that contradict what most doctors have been telling their patients in reference to the CDC Guidelines. It makes one wonder just who should we believe?

CDC Letter to a Chronic Pain Patient

*If you are a Chronic Pain Patient on Opioid medication to control your pain conditions, and you have had problems since the “Guidelines” came out, please write to the CDC and other government agencies and/or officials and tell them what its like to live with your daily pain. It can be a brief letter as long as you get your point across to them. One thing to remember is to be as polite as you can. We will not get through to them if we write a letter when we are angry. I know this can and will be a chore for a lot of us to do, but please know that I understand how one feels when you suffer with unbearable, debilitating daily pain. 

Take Care of Yourselves! 

Karla Rabel, 
Disabled Nurse, Chronic Pain Patient, Pain Advocate,
and Mom at Rabel Ranch Kitty Rescue.

Living With Daily Pain On Facebook and Google+
Twitter @karlarabel1

Severe Chronic Pain is a Killer, Literally

EDS and Chronic Pain News & Info

Pain-Topics News/Research UPDATES: Severe Chronic Pain is a Killer – Study Finds

Previous research has demonstrated a clearly negative influence of chronic pain on health.

Now, a new study portrays a profound link between severe chronic pain and death; inflicting nearly a70% greater mortality risk than even cardiovascular disease.  

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